Wednesday, September 2, 2015

September #IWSG: Don't Quit

Come join Alex J. Cavanaugh and the Insecure Writer's Support Group. We discuss our fears, insecurities, ups and downs of the writing process and post the first Wednesday of every month! http://alexjcavanaugh.blogspot.com/p/the-insecure-writers-support-group.html




Roller coasters. We've all been on them unless you aren't human. When I was fifteen, I landed my first job at a Six Flags where I worked in food service. It sucked, but it was pretty cool because one day I met Tone Loc. (80s rap star) Before his concert, he ordered two foot long hot dogs and handed me a one hundred dollar bill. In his gravely voice, he told me to keep the change. But sadly, we weren't allowed to keep the change.

I've been to many a Six Flags, Great America, and amusement parks over the years, but there's one coaster in the Wisconsin Dells at Mount Olympus that would make Rick Riordan proud. Hades. Yes, they don't call it Hades for nothing. Welcome to the world's first upside-down, underground wooden roller coaster. One minute you are high in the sky, enjoying the ascent overlooking the vast, lush, rolling hillsides along the Wisconsin River. The next moment you are plummeting in a death drop, feeling your spine ripped from your body. Just when you think it can't get any worse (and you're hoping the big guy in front of you doesn't lose his lunch), you plunge into complete darkness, racing along at 70-freaking-miles per hour as the the ride shoots through the parking lot under tons of cement. You pray none of the bolts are loose, because derailing from a freak coaster accident in broad daylight is one thing. Cashing in complete darkness would be the end of me, literally.

Welcome to Hades

Okay, I give you my comparison between coasters and a writer's life. One day you are up soaring above the sweet clouds taking a sweet look at the sweet horizon before you. The writing life is good. The next scene, you on a downward spiral of fear and rejection, realizing your spine has been ripped from your body and you will never get out alive. Everyone goes through the good, the bad, and the ugly as a writer. Some days will be better than others and some days you will feel like quitting and getting a job at Six Flags selling hot dogs. Don't quit.You're almost there.

32 comments:

  1. You nailed it Jennifer. A writer's life is like riding on the coaster, with the ups and downs coming thick and fast :(

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  2. I worked at an amusement park, too. I was backstage in the music theatre, far away from the roller coasters. I like it better that way.

    IWSG September Post

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    1. I was pretty daring back then. I'm a little more cautious now. I like my spine and my neck to be in alignment.

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  3. Writing definitely feels like a roller coaster. I think I'll stay away from the real life ones...

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    1. It really does. Too bad there has to be the downside at times, because the view from the top can be amazing!

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  4. I will pass on that coaster experience.
    You couldn't keep the change? Bummer.
    We just have to remember that every time we go down, there will be a corresponding up on the other side.

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    1. We'd get fired if we kept change/tips. It is nice to know the downside doesn't last forever!

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  5. I knew there was something strange about me! I've never been on a roller coaster. That sure explains a lot. ;) But I have definitely been on the roller coaster of life, writing, and publishing.

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    1. WHAT??? If we were friends in high school, I would've dragged you with me:)

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  6. Eventually your stomach adapts to the regular ups and downs, but it takes years, and there are still the occasional ones that take you by surprise. Here's to figuring out how to enjoy the ride. All of it.

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    1. Yes, over time a writer learns to adapt and quickly.

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    2. Or they get off the ride and laugh manically about the crazy they once considered a career. Either way...

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  7. Haha great post! My dad talks about Six Flags, he went there a lot as a kid...we just went to Cedar Point (in Ohio). Super fun, because it was the first time everyone in my family actually wanted to ride all the kids, with the younger kids being tall enough and everything. Anyway, that's irrelevant. Sort of. But you make an excellent point! The ride is beautiful and crazy and messy and scary all at the same time...it's important to remember through the easy parts that it will be hard again and the hard parts that it will be easy again, but to live in the present and savor every minute.

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    1. My hubs grew up going to Cedar Point! Live for the moment and enjoy it.

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  8. You know, I've used the rollercoaster analogy myself, but it just now occurred to me how much I hate riding rollercoasters. Terrified of them. I hope that doesn't mean I'm not cut out to be a writer.

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    1. Ha! I guess I've always been an adrenaline junkie. Not so much the older I get;-)

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  9. Great metaphor. I wonder that I write anything because I'm a real roller coaster sissy.

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  10. For sure, this journey is a major roller coaster. At times, I felt like I was on permanent vacation in Hades. I often wonder, "Why do we put ourselves through this?"

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    1. I thought you said, "Magic roller coaster." Ha! That would explain some of this journey. Don't worry, I've thought the same thing a 1000 times.

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  11. For sure, this journey is a major roller coaster. At times, I felt like I was on permanent vacation in Hades. I often wonder, "Why do we put ourselves through this?"

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  12. I used to go to Six Flags when I was young and had a great time! I can imagine it'd be less great if I worked there. I love the metaphor of the roller coaster. Yes, things can sure go up and down. lol

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    1. And sometimes how quickly things can change from one day to the next.

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  13. Any post with roller coasters in it has to be fabulous. Good analogy.

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  14. Apparently, I'm not human, then. (Been to Disneyland numerous times. I always waited on the side while the others went on the coasters. Not my thing.)

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    1. Oops. I'm getting the hint writers aren't exactly the crazy bunch I anticipated. Maybe it's because I have teen boys.

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  15. OMG, this perfectly describes my mental state today. Just got off a crazy high -- and that is always followed by a depressing low. It doesn't even take something bad to happen. It's just that you can't stay at the top of that roller coaster. It has to come down.

    Here's to all of us climbing to the top of that hill again ... :)

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  16. I just finished the final book in my Piper Morgan series about an hour ago...reading this reminded me what a HUGE accomplishment that was. Four books! I need to celebrate...but it's too late. I'll crack open some wine tomorrow!

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  17. I always tell myself publishing is a roller coaster ride. I've experienced so many ups and downs.

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  18. Great analogy. I feel like I'm making my way through darkness while writing, rather than the open air, but at least I try and keep moving!

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